I got a phone call from a friend saying that I had lost a fight. He judged himself prejudiced by the refereeing in a given championship, he blamed the referee for his defeat. He did not admit he lost. Finally, taking some possible arbitration error (to err is human, referees can err also, without second intentions, and not necessarily intentionally be damaging someone), all athletes, when entering a competition, know the main rule: in the fight, one will win and the other lose. It seems clear, but many forget it.

It is also obvious that everyone comes in to win, but sometimes they lose. In a competition, you can only have one winner by category, and often, in defeat, we can draw important lessons to ensure future victories. Find out where you went wrong in the fight. Did not have strategy? Tired? Were your techniques in certain situations in the fight not efficient? Nervousness? And what many fighters do not even think about, but unfortunately it can happen, and if the other athlete was better on some factor or on several factors?

Once the adrenaline comes out of the blood, mentally try to remember the whole fight or watch the fight if someone filmed it. Observe your and your opponent’s movements. The right moves must be stimulated and developed, and the wrong ones must be corrected.

Victory is always the ultimate in the fighter’s life. It does not matter if it’s a compatition or a training session inside your gym. Which fighter does not have in his memory fights that he does not forget? Or even one that lost by points, but was not finished? Only this, to his understanding, for him is a victory, since he recognizes the superiority of his opponent. Winning is always good. Returning home knowing that you have defeated an athlete that you know has physical superiority, technique, or both, that sense of victory takes you to sleep. Win by points or by finishing is always a stimulus for each time we train more. But victory can not bring with it arrogance or lack of humility. Victory should be the reason for you to improve your Jiu-Jitsu and make it more efficient.

A defeat can point to your weak part, and from the recognition of your weakness, you can work and improve even to the point of making your quality stronger. Losing is bad, but not knowing why you lost is even worse! Once the adrenaline comes out of the blood, mentally try to remember the whole fight or watch the fight if someone filmed it. Observe your and your opponent’s movements. The right moves must be stimulated and developed, and the wrong ones must be corrected, studied, not repeated, and “unmade” movements must be studied very much because these moments are often that allow the opponent to win.

I believe that if the fighter thinks correctly, he will never see a loss as a total loss, or an episode that must be forgotten quickly, he will always be able to draw lessons for future fights and will certainly be rewarded with victories. Victory is always on the goal of every fighter in any fight, but we have to know how to deserve it.

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